English, Media & Film

KS3 English

Intent

Our aim is to provide an English curriculum which is engaging, coherent and inclusive of all learners, enabling students to master concepts by studying and producing a broad range of texts.

We believe there is a great dignity in the way in which our KS3 curriculum exposes students to the canon, building their cultural capital, whilst also teaching them media texts that enable them to engage critically with film and advertising. 

The writing units, Expressions of Self, The Gothic and The Art of Storytelling, enable our students to develop their own unique voice, whilst developing as technically accurate writers. Our literature units explicitly teach students how to structure academic writing, developing accomplished literature students who are confident to engage with challenging texts.

The structure of lessons is clear and deliberate, with regular retrieval practice and homework embedded to ensure that key knowledge is retained by students. Students are regularly assessed and supported in filling gaps in their knowledge.

Curriculum sequence

Year 7

Expressions of Self

The Gothic

Poetry: The Natural World

Great Expectations

Media: Wildlife Charity

Year 8

Media: Jaws

Gothic Poetry

The Art of Storytelling

Of Mice and Men

Twelfth Night

Each unit is 7-8 weeks long

Meeting the needs of SEND and Pupil Premium students 

In line with whole-school priorities, English teachers place SEND and Pupil Premium students at the centre of our lesson planning. Key to ensuring this is high quality teaching: we direct questions to PP and SEND students, check their understanding regularly and provide feedback using whole-class feedback and CAR sheets, which will be in student exercise books. Students are given opportunities, in lesson time, to act on their feedback.

Ensuring SEND and Pupil Premium students can access our English curriculum is extremely important to us and these inclusive strategies, which benefit all students, are particularly supportive:

  • Sentence starters and models are embedded within schemes of learning so students are aware of what excellent work looks like, and have access to the support necessary to produce it.
  • Regular opportunities for retrieval are offered using our retrieval starters. Students are regularly retrieve knowledge from previous lessons, the beginning of the unit and previous units.
  • Vocabulary is explicitly taught

Retention

Our curriculum is taught to be remembered. Retrieval practice is embedded into lessons; students complete retrieval quizzes as silent starters in all Key Stage 3 units. All through Key stage 3 students are supported with revision skills,  and are provided with knowledge organisers to revise the key knowledge for each unit.

Assessment

The assessment model for each unit is comprised of two formal assessment points:

1. Threshold Knowledge Assessment

Occurs midway through the unit and is based heavily on the knowledge organiser. This diagnoses whether students have retained and understand the key knowledge and concepts that are essential to success in that unit.

This assessment will be a mixture of short-answer and multiple choice questions, and will be self/peer marked. Questions are grouped together to diagnose areas of misapprehension.

 

2. Extended Assessment

This is an extended piece of writing focused on extended literary writing, writing for real-life purposes, or imaginative writing. The tasks increase in challenge each time a particular type of writing is assessed.

The extended assessment is judged according to the descriptors for each unit.  Teachers diagnose success in the relevant strands, and provide feedback and time for students to address their skills deficits and then apply this in improving their work.

These formal assessment opportunities are complimented by informal formative assessment within lessons such as meaningful and well-scaffolded self-assessment and ‘Retrieval quizzes’ to activate prior knowledge.  Feedback is provided with CAR feedback sheets and whole-class feedback which provide opportunities for students to complete tasks relevant to areas in which they need to develop.

 

Contact:

 

Miss Hannah Rabey

Head of English

hrabey@st-birinus.oxon.sch.uk

 

Mr Sam Elliott

Second in English

selliott@st-birinus.oxon.sch.uk

 

 

GCSE English Language

The course will enable students of all abilities to develop the skills they need to read, understand and analyse a wide range of different texts covering the 19th, 20th and 21st century time periods as well as to write clearly, coherently and accurately using a range of vocabulary and sentence structures.

Course outline

The course is divided into 3 key sections that address different skills; reading, writing and spoken language. This course will develop students to:

  • read a wide range of texts, fluently and with good understanding
  • read critically, and use knowledge gained from wide reading to inform and improve their own writing
  • write effectively and coherently using Standard English appropriately
  • use grammar correctly, punctuate and spell accurately
  • acquire and apply a wide vocabulary, alongside a knowledge and understanding of grammatical terminology, and linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language.

     

     

    Paper 1 – Explorations in creative reading and writing (50% of the GCSE)

    Section A – Reading: one literature fiction text

    Section B – Writing: descriptive or narrative writing

    Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes

     

    Paper 2 – Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives (50% of the GCSE)

    Section A – Reading: one non-fiction and one literary non-fiction text

    Section B – Writing: writing to present a viewpoint

    Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes

     

    Non-examination Assessment (0% of the GCSE – separate endorsement)

     

  • presenting
  • responding to questions and feedback
  • use of Standard English

 

Assessment and Progression

Examination Board:  

AQA

 

Grading system:

1-9 (9 is highest)

 

Assessment:

2 final examinations

1 non examined assessment

 

Paper 1 – Explorations in creative reading and writing. 1hr 45 minutes

 

Paper 2 – Writers’ viewoints and perspectives. 1hr 45 minutes

 

Non examined assessment – separate endorsement.

 

Exam questions are a mix of multiple-choice, short and long answers.

 

Progression to Post-16:

A-Level English Language, A Level English Literature, A Level English Language and Literature.

 

Future career links:

Journalism

Teaching

Publishing

Librarian

Public Relations

 

Contact:

Ms Hopkins

jhopkins@st-birinus.oxon.sch.uk

Ms Rabey

hrabey@st-birinus.oxon.sch.uk

Mr Elliott

selliott@st-birinus.oxon.sch.uk

GCSE English Literature

Course outline

This course will develop students to:

  • read a wide range of classic literature fluently and with good understanding, and make connections across their reading
  • read in depth, critically and evaluatively, so that they are able to discuss and explain their understanding and ideas
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often
  • appreciate the depth and power of the English literary heritage
  • write accurately, effectively and analytically about their reading, using Standard English
  • acquire and use a wide vocabulary, including the grammatical terminology and other literary and linguistic terms they need to criticise and analyse what they read.

 

Paper 1 – Shakespeare and the 19th-century novel (40% of the GCSE)

 

Section A - Shakespeare: students will answer one question on Macbeth by William Shakespeare. They will be required to write in detail about an extract from the play and then to write about the play as a whole.

 

Section B - The 19th-century novel: students will answer one question on The Sign of the Four by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. They will be required to write in detail about an extract from the novel and then to write about the novel as a whole.

Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes

 

Paper 2 – Modern texts and poetry (60% of the GCSE)

Section A – Reading: one non-fiction and one literary non-fiction text

Section B – Writing: writing to present a viewpoint

 

Section A Modern texts: students will answer one essay question from a choice of two on An Inspector Calls by J B Priestley.

 

Section B Poetry: students will answer one comparative question on one named poem printed on the paper and one other poem from their chosen anthology cluster: Power and Conflict.

 

Section C Unseen poetry: Students will answer one question on one unseen poem and one question comparing this poem with a second unseen poem.

Written exam: 2 hours 15 minutes

 

Assessment and Progression

Examination Board:  

AQA

 

Grading system:

1-9 (9 is highest)

 

Assessment:

2 final examinations

 

Paper 1 – Shakespeare and the 19th –century novel. 1hr 45 minutes

 

Paper 2 – Modern texts and poetry. 2hrs 15 minutes

 

 

Exam questions are all long answers.

 

Progression to Post-16:

A-Level English Language, A Level English Literature, A Level English Language and Literature, A Level Drama, A Level Theatre Studies.

 

Future career links:

Journalism

Teaching

Publishing

Librarian

Public Relations

Law

 

Contact:

Ms Hopkins

jhopkins@st-birinus.oxon.sch.uk

Ms Rabey

hrabey@st-birinus.oxon.sch.uk

Mr Elliott

selliott@st-birinus.oxon.sch.uk

GCSE Media Studies

GCSE Media Studies offers you an interactive and engaging course that aims to broaden your mind. You’ll cover all aspects of media including language, representations, industries and audiences, giving you both an overall and in-depth understanding of how media represents the world.

Course outline

The course is divided into 3 key sections, each of which is examined at the end of Year 11, although the NEA is completed during year 10 and 11.

Unit 1 (35% of the GCSE)

Section A – Media Language and Media Representations.

Questions in this section can test any two of the following forms:

  • magazines
  • advertising and marketing
  • newspapers
  • online, social and participatory media and video games.

Section B - Media Industries and Media Audiences.

Questions in this section can test any two of the following forms:

  • radio
  • music video
  • newspapers
  • online, social and participatory media and video games
  • film (industries only).

Unit 2 (35% of the GCSE)

Section A will be based on a screening from an extract of one of the television Close Study Products and can test any area of the theoretical framework.

Section B will be based on either newspapers or online, social and participatory media and video games and can test any area of the framework.

Unit 3 – Non-examination Assessment (30% of the GCSE)

This unit involves creating a media product based on one of five briefs set by AQA. It tests:

  • Application of knowledge and understanding of the theoretical framework.
  • Ability to create media products.

Assessment and Progression

Examination Board:  

AQA

Grading system:

1-9 (9 is highest)

Assessment:

2 final examinations

Non-exam assessment: creating a media product

Paper 1 –Media Language and Representations. Media Audiences and Industries.  1hr 30 minutes

Paper 2 – Analysing unseen texts

1hr 30 minutes

NEA – choice of one of five annually changing briefs, set by AQA.

Exam questions are a mix of multiple-choice, short and long answers.

Progression to Post-16:

A-Level Film or Media Studies.

Future career links:

TV or Film production

Journalism

Marketing

Contact:

Ms Edmond

ledmond@st-birinus.oxon.sch.uk

GCSE Film Studies

GCSE Film Studies 

Our aim is to provide a Film Studies curriculum that engages all learners and equips students with a sound knowledge of the technical aspects of film and film production. The skills learnt in Film Studies lessons will be learnt through a combination of the analysis of key sequences in set films and retrieval activities that enable students to feel confident in speaking and writing about film. Students will also put into practice the practical elements of film through the creation of their own film production which will deepen their own understanding but also foster a passion for film creation.

Assessment

Assessments will take place each term, during and at the end of each scheme of learning and all assessments will be used to help students to set their own targets for improvement.

Film is highly relevant to students’ lives so it is our intention that students across the attainment range are encouraged and supported in forming their own opinions on the films that they study and that this helps to shape their individual view of the world around them.

Curriculum 

· Introduction to the Core Study Areas of film

· Global Contemporary UK film and aesthetics

· Global English Language Film and narrative

· Global Non-English Language film and representation

· Key Developments in Film and Film Technology

· Film Genre

· US Independent Film

· Specialist Writing 

Back to Top